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SKYIANS
Project to Prevent Child Labor in Home-Based Carpet Production in Afghanistan

RFPs

Project to Prevent Child Labor in Home-Based Carpet Production in Afghanistan

DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of International Labor Affairs
Project to Prevent Child Labor in Home-Based Carpet Production in Afghanistan
ANNOUNCEMENT TYPE: New Notice of Availability of Funds and Solicitation for Cooperative Agreement
Applications (SCA).
FUNDING OPPORTUNITY NUMBER: SCA 13-11
CATALOG OF FEDERAL DOMESTIC ASSISTANCE NUMBER: N/A.
TOTAL FUNDING AVAILABLE FOR AWARD: $2 million.
NUMBER OF ANTICIPATED FUNDING AWARDS: One or more.
FUNDING PERIOD: Effective date of award up to 4 years.
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY: In Fiscal Year 2013, the U.S. Department of Labor’s (USDOL), Bureau of
International Labor Affairs (ILAB) will award up to $2 million for one or more cooperative agreements to fund a
technical assistance project(s) to support efforts to reduce the worst forms of child labor in the home-based
production of carpets in Afghanistan by designing and piloting a sustainable social compliance system in
collaboration with at least one carpet company. Eligible Applicants may include any commercial, international,
educational, or non-profit organization(s), including any faith-based, community-based, or public international
organization(s). See Section III for detailed eligibility requirements.
KEY DATES:
 Issuance Date: June 17, 2013.
 Closing Date: August 2, 2013
 Closing Time: 5:00 PM EST.
 Technical Question Submission Deadline: July 12, 2013
 Date of Web chat: Within 30 after the SCA issuance date.
 Date of Award: No later than September 30, 2013
AGENCY CONTACTS:
Primary: Katima Wilson, Grant Specialist Alternate: Brenda J. White, Grant Officer (GO)
Email: Ops.grantoffice@dol.gov Email: Ops.grantoffice@dol.gov
Telephone: 202.693.4570 Telephone: 202.693.4570
Applications will be accepted via electronic submission via Grants.gov (http://www.grants.gov) or by hardcopy
(to include electronic copy/CD) hand delivered or mailed to the GO at the following address:
USDOL/ Office of Procurement Services (OPS)
Attn: Brenda White, Grant Officer
200 Constitution Avenue NW, Room S-4307
Washington, DC 20210
Reference: SCA 13-11
A list of frequently asked questions about USDOL’s Solicitations for Cooperative Agreements for ILAB grants
and responses to technical questions received by e-mail will be posted on www.dol.gov/ILAB/grants/main.htm.
Transcripts of web chats will be posted on http://www.dol.gov/dol/chat/.
Solicitation for Cooperative Agreement 13-11 Page 2 of 36
TABLE OF CONTENTS
I. FUNDING OPPORTUNITY DESCRIPTION ………………………………………………………………………………3
II. AWARD INFORMATION……………………………………………………………………………………………………….12
III. ELIGIBILITY INFORMATION ……………………………………………………………………………………………….12
IV. APPLICATION AND SUBMISSION INFORMATION………………………………………………………………14
V. APPLICATION REVIEW INFORMATION ………………………………………………………………………………23
VI. AWARD ADMINISTRATION INFORMATION ……………………………………………………………………….25
VII. AGENCY CONTACTS……………………………………………………………………………………………………………29
VIII. OTHER INFORMATION ………………………………………………………………………………………………………..29
IX. APPENDICES…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………29
APPENDIX A: TERMS AND DEFINITIONS…………………………………………………………………………………………..29
APPENDIX B: ILAB COMMON INDICATORS AND SUB-INDICATORS……………………………………………….35
APPENDIX C: SAMPLE PAST PERFORMANCE TABLE……………………………………………………………………….36
APPENDIX D: DOCUMENTS REQUIRED FOR APPLICATION SUBMISSION ………………………………………36
LIST OF ACRONYMS
CFR Code of Federal Regulations
CLMS Child Labor Monitoring System
CMEP Comprehensive Monitoring and Evaluation Plan
CPAN Child Protection Action Network
DBMS Direct Beneficiary Monitoring System
DUNS Dun and Bradstreet
FCA Federal Cognizant Agency
FFR Federal Financial Report
FOIA Freedom of Information Act
GO Grant Officer
GOR Grant Officer’s Representative
GoIRA Government of the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan
ILAB Bureau of International Labor Affairs
ILO International Labor Organization
ILO-IPEC ILO’s International Program on the Elimination of Child Labor
M&E Monitoring and Evaluation
MOLSAMD Ministry of Labor, Social Affairs, Martyrs, and Disabled
MPG Management Procedures and Guidelines
NGOs Nongovernmental Organizations
NICRA Negotiated Indirect Cost Rate Agreement
OCFT Office of Child Labor, Forced Labor, and Human Trafficking
OMB Office of Management and Budget
OPS Office of Procurement Services
PIO Public International Organization
SCA Solicitation for Cooperative Agreement Applications
SF Standard Form
TDA Trade and Development Act
TPR Technical Progress Report
TVPRA Trafficking Victims Reauthorization Act
UNICEF United Nations Children’s Fund
USDOL U.S. Department of Labor
VAT Value Added Tax
Solicitation for Cooperative Agreement 13-11 Page 3 of 36
TERMS AND DEFINITIONS
For the purposes of responding to this SCA, Applicants use of terms must correspond with USDOL’s definitions
in Appendix A.
I. FUNDING OPPORTUNITY DESCRIPTION
USDOL/ILAB intends to award up to $2 million for a cooperative agreement(s) to one or more qualifying
organizations to address child labor in at least one district of Afghanistan in which there is evidence of a high
prevalence of child labor in home-based carpet weaving workplaces. The Applicant must partner with at least one
carpet company that sources woven carpets from home-based production sites in Afghanistan, and develop and
implement a social compliance system for that company’s carpet supply chain. The Applicant must describe how
it will establish an independent monitoring system to verify the company’s compliance with company standards to
eliminate child labor in its home-based carpet weaving workplaces. Additionally, the Applicant must describe
how it will ensure that identified child laborers receive remediation services. Cooperative agreements awarded
under this solicitation will be managed by ILAB’s Office of Child Labor, Forced Labor and Human Trafficking
(OCFT). The duration of the project(s) funded by this solicitation is up to four (4) years. The project start date
will be negotiated upon award of individual cooperative agreement(s) but will be no later than December 31,
2013.
ILAB’s mission is to use all available channels to improve working conditions, raise living standards, protect
workers’ ability to exercise their rights, and address the workplace exploitation of children and other vulnerable
populations internationally. OCFT conducts and funds research, develops strategic partnerships, and funds an
international technical cooperation program to eliminate the worst forms of child labor, forced labor, and human
trafficking. USDOL/ILAB is authorized to award and administer cooperative agreements by the Consolidated and
Further Continuing Appropriations Act, 2013, P.L. 113-6 (2013) and Department of Labor Appropriations Act,
2012, P.L. 112-74 (2011). Cooperative agreements awarded under this solicitation will be administered by the
USDOL OPS and technically managed by OCFT.
1
A. Background and Problem Statement
The following section provides summary information about the child labor situation in Afghan homebased carpet weaving workplaces. The Applicant will be required to provide additional background
information in their proposal describing in greater detail the specific problem to be addressed by their
proposed project.
1. Overview of Child Labor in the Afghan Carpet Sector
Hand woven carpets represent Afghanistan’s largest official export. While production has
declined in recent years, reports indicate that the hand woven carpet sector still directly employs
over two million workers and indirectly employs another two million workers.2 The weaving of
carpets is often performed by women and children in the home. In fact, according to one report,
two out of three carpet weavers in Afghanistan are children.3 Amongst child workers in this
sector, the majority are girls.4
Afghanistan’s Labor Code sets the minimum age for work, including work in hazardous
occupations, at 18.5 However, there are exceptions to this law. A child may work as an apprentice

1 To learn more about our work, please see http://www.dol.gov/ilab/programs/ocft.
2 GoodWeave, GoodWeave Final Report, May 3, 2012.
3 Altai Consulting, A Rapid Assessment on Child Labour in Kabul, Kabul, January 2008, Macro International, DRAFT Child
Labor in Afghanistan, Calverton, MD, February 8, 2008.
4 Macro International, DRAFT Child Labor in Afghanistan.
5
Labour Code, (February 4, 2007); available from
http://www.ilo.org/dyn/natlex/natlex_browse.details?p_lang=en&p_country=AFG&p_classification=01.02&p_origin=COU
Solicitation for Cooperative Agreement 13-11 Page 4 of 36
at age 14 and children between ages 15 and 18 may engage in light work up to 35 hours per
week.6 The Labor Code prohibits the recruitment of children younger than age 18 for work that is
harmful to their health or that causes physical damage or disability. However, the Government of
the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan (GoIRA) has not defined hazardous working conditions and
occupations prohibited for children. The Ministry of Labor, Social Affairs, Martyrs, and Disabled
(MOLSAMD) leads and coordinates government efforts to address child labor, including laws to
combat child labor. It employs 20 inspectors to cover the entirety of the country.7 These labor
inspectors do not inspect informal workplaces, such as home-based carpet weaving workplaces.
Children often work in the carpet sector in contravention of Afghanistan’s law. Children working
in the carpet sector reportedly start at very young ages, sometimes as young as six or seven years
old, and can work up to 12 hours per day.8 They suffer from a number of poor working conditions
including exposure to dust from the wool and noxious fumes resulting in respiratory diseases.9
While there is no Afghanistan-specific research on the topic, research on carpet production from
other countries indicates that children working to produce hand-woven carpets suffer from
physical ailments due to the repetitive motions of weaving.
B. Objectives and Expected Outcomes
Applicants must respond fully to the project objectives and required interventions outlined below in order
to be considered responsive.
This section provides information on the target populations to be served by the project and key areas of
intervention. Applicants must develop a proposal that presents a clear strategy that addresses the Project
Focus, Expected Outcomes and Program Interventions described below.
1. Project Focus
The Applicant must propose a project to reduce the worst forms of child labor in the home-based
production of carpets in Afghanistan. The Applicant must propose a strategy for designing and
piloting a sustainable social compliance system in collaboration with at least one carpet company.
The Applicant is encouraged to consider implementing this social compliance system in one or
more rural districts in Afghanistan.
2. Expected Outcomes
The project must support achievement of the following outcomes:
(1) At least one partner carpet company must develop or refine a social compliance system and
internally monitor its carpet supply chain to ensure compliance with the new company
standards and to ensure that child labor is not used in home-based weaving workplaces;
(2) A third-party verification system to monitor the use of child labor in home-based carpet
weaving workplaces to be operated by the Grantee;
(3) Remediation services (education, life skills, livelihoods, etc.) must be provided to persons
identified by the monitoring system as engaged in child labor and to members of their
households;
(4) Reliable data on child labor in the carpet supply chain must be made available to relevant
stakeholders; and

NTRY&p_sortby=SORTBY_COUNTRY.
6
Ibid.
7 U.S. Embassy- Kabul, reporting, March 15, 2010.
8 Altai Consulting, A Rapid Assessment on Child Labour in Kabul, Afghanistan Independent Human Rights Commission, An
Overview on Situation of Child Labour in Afghanistan Research Report, Kabul, 2006.
9 Macro International, DRAFT Child Labor in Afghanistan, Altai Consulting, A Rapid Assessment on Child Labour in Kabul,
Afghanistan Independent Human Rights Commission, Situation of Child Labour in Afghanistan.
Solicitation for Cooperative Agreement 13-11 Page 5 of 36
(5) Raise awareness among industry members, community and local government officials, and
other relevant stakeholders of the dangers of child labor in the carpet industry and relevant
Afghan laws.
The Applicant’s proposal must (1) demonstrate an in-depth knowledge and understanding of the
child labor situation in the carpet sector of Afghanistan (particularly in home-based weaving); (2)
demonstrate a broad understanding of Afghanistan’s cultural, economic, social, and legal
contexts, particularly in the communities where the pilot would be carried out, including
children’s (girls’) access to education; and (3) promote sustainability and long-term progress
toward a significant reduction in child labor in the partner company(ies’) supply chain(s).
Sustainability should be incorporated at all stages of a project, including design, staffing,
implementation, and evaluation. Sustainability will be linked to project impact and the ability of
local stakeholders to continue successful efforts initiated by the USDOL-funded project after the
project has ended. The Applicant should work to build the capacity of key individuals and/or
organization(s) that can potentially contribute to long-term sustainability.
C. Targets and Partners
1. Targets
The company(ies) targeted by the project must partner with the Applicant and be a carpet
producing company(ies) operating in Afghanistan. To qualify as a partner company, the company
must use home based weaving workplaces within its supply chain.
Applicants must target children ages 5-18 engaged in child labor home based carpet weaving
workplaces in the applicant’s target district(s) for remediation services.
Applicants are required to identify additional target stakeholders for other project components.
2. Partners
In preparing their applications and in determining project interventions, Applicants should consult
with key stakeholders and organizations working on efforts to address child labor and its root
causes including: the Afghan Carpet Exporter’s Guild; Child Protection Action Network (CPAN);
international organizations; non-governmental organizations (NGOs); national steering and
advisory committees on child labor and education; faith-based organizations and community
development associations; trade unions; employers’ and teachers’ organizations; and children
engaged in child labor and members of their households. Applicants must include a brief
description of the consultative process undertaken in preparing their proposal.
USDOL encourages Applicants to establish partnerships that advance the goals of the award.
Efforts should be made to avoid duplication and to build upon previous USDOL-funded activities
in the country and other current child labor initiatives carried out by other organizations.
Applicants must also demonstrate efforts to coordinate with other relevant projects funded by
U.S. Government agencies.
D. Project Interventions
All proposals responding to this solicitation must address the following project components and must also
address how these components may be impacted by changes in Afghanistan’s complex security
environment:
1. Technical support to partner company(ies) to establish a social compliance system
The Applicant must propose a strategy to assist its partner carpet company(ies) with the
development or refinement10 of a social compliance system that includes mechanisms for

10 In the case of a partner carpet company that already has its own set of company standards, the Applicant may propose how
Solicitation for Cooperative Agreement 13-11 Page 6 of 36
addressing child labor. The social compliance system must include a set of company standards
that will apply to its supply chain. The Applicant must refer to internationally-recognized labor
standards when assisting in the development of the company standards. The Applicant must
describe how it would develop the capacity of its partner company(ies) to communicate these
standards to relevant stakeholders within its supply chain. The Applicant must also describe how
it will support its partner company(ies) in developing a monitoring system to track compliance
with the company standards throughout the supply chain. At a minimum, this must include
assisting the partner company(ies) to develop its own internal monitoring system to ensure that
child labor is not used within the company’s associated home-based weaving workplaces.
2. Piloting of an independent third party verification system to monitor partner
company(ies) compliance with company standards regarding the prohibition of child labor
in home-based carpet weaving workplaces
The Applicant must propose how it will establish an independent third party verification system
in which the Applicant will monitor partner company’s (ies’) use of child labor in home-based
carpet weaving workplaces. The Applicant must describe in detail how the independent
verification system will work and how it will detect child labor in home-based carpet weaving. To
promote sustainability, the Applicant must also propose a strategy for consulting and working
with appropriate GoIRA ministries (e.g., the Labor and Commerce ministries) on the
development and implementation of this system in order to allow for the GoIRA’s future
participation and development of oversight mechanisms to confirm that their products are not
made by child labor.
The Applicant must also describe how the project will take steps to assess and mitigate the risk of
children withdrawn from child labor in carpet production entering other, possibly worse, forms of
child labor.
3. Remediation services for children identified as engaged in child labor
The Applicant must describe how children will be provided with remediation services, including
providing children with access to educational opportunities and improving work conditions for
those of legal working age to ensure they are in compliance with national and international
standards for labor. Such educational opportunities could include formal education at the primary
or secondary level or nonformal education programs. The Applicant is encouraged to refer project
beneficiaries to existing governmental and nongovernmental programs. These could include
programs that provide educational, psychosocial, life skills and other services to vulnerable
children and/or livelihood support services to their household members. In areas where such
service providers do not exist, the Applicant must propose and describe how beneficiaries would
be provided remediation services by the project. In discussion of its remediation services, the
Applicant must also describe how the project will address the special needs of girl beneficiaries.
To improve coordination and the sustainability of such services, the Applicant is encouraged to
work with the GoIRA to promote greater coordination and collaboration with NGOs and relevant
government entities.
Where beneficial to achievement of the project’s goals, the Applicant is encouraged to seek
partnerships and linkages with local governments and international and/or local organizations that
have experience and expertise in direct service provision to child laborers and children at highrisk of entering child labor and members of their households. Applicants are also encouraged to
create linkages to existing social protection programs or other poverty alleviation interventions.
4. Supporting research and evaluation on child labor in the Afghanistan carpet sector

it will work with the partner company to improve these standards.
Solicitation for Cooperative Agreement 13-11 Page 7 of 36
a) Research on child labor in the carpet supply chain
The Applicant must propose research on the prevalence and nature of child labor throughout
the carpet supply chain, from the production of wool to the sale of carpets in the market in a
minimum of one targeted district in Afghanistan. If the supply chain includes geographic
areas beyond the targeted district(s), the project may limit research to those portions of the
supply chain within the target district(s). This research must culminate in a final written
report to be submitted to USDOL and made publicly available. One research goal should be
to develop information that can be used to inform and expand future social compliance
systems to ensure that child labor is not present in any part of the carpet production supply
chain.
b) Research on child labor in home-based carpet weaving
The project must conduct quantitative and qualitative research on the nature of child labor
and the dangerous work conditions prevalent in home-based weaving workplaces; the nature
and incidence of forced labor, as applicable; motivational factors for families and relevant
stakeholders across the supply chain to use child labor; cultural and gender norms and how
they affect attitudes towards child labor; and education, employment, livelihood and poverty
alleviation alternatives for: (1) children below the minimum age of work; (2) children of legal
working age working in dangerous conditions; and (3) other members of carpet weaving
households.
c) Baseline survey, research, and evaluations
As part of post-award requirements, Grantees must engage in a number of data collection and
research activities, including baseline and endline surveys, and a needs assessment on school
conditions. During the first year, applicants are expected to conduct the baseline survey. The
baseline and endline surveys must collect quantitative data to assist in determining the nature
and incidence of child labor in the home-based weaving sector and identify potential
beneficiaries for remediation in the targeted geographic areas, as described in Section IV.
Applicants are encouraged to use best research practices for conducting surveys on child
labor. The baseline and endline surveys must also include information about children’s
working conditions, children’s living conditions, and children’s participation in education in
the target areas. Applicants are required to identify whether their own staff, a partner
organization, or a sub-contractor will carry out the baseline and endline surveys and describe
their qualifications for conducting child labor surveys.
The Applicant must also confirm a commitment to collaborate with USDOL External
Monitoring and Evaluation (M&E) Experts after award to carry out up to two implementation
evaluations and performance monitoring. For more information, please see Section IV on
Application and Submission Information.
5. Raising awareness
The Applicant must propose strategies for raising awareness of the hazards of child labor and the
costs of missed education opportunities. Such awareness raising efforts must specifically target
parents, community members, local government and civic organizations, and other communitybased stakeholders. The Applicant should consider highlighting factors such as the social,
economic, and community benefits of a child-labor free home-based carpet weaving workplace
and encourage local citizens to advocate for and support industry efforts to adhere to national
child labor laws and decent working conditions overall. The Applicant must also raise awareness
of the following Afghan laws: the Afghanistan Labor Law, the Afghanistan Education Law, and
the Afghan Constitution Law.
Solicitation for Cooperative Agreement 13-11 Page 8 of 36
6. Monitoring and Collection of Reliable Data on Child Labor
Applicants must propose a strategy and methodology for monitoring the project’s direct
beneficiaries, including the education and work status of child beneficiaries. Applicants must
provide details on the components of their proposed direct beneficiary monitoring system
(DBMS), including at a minimum, systems/tools for collecting and storing data, sources of data,
proposed frequency for data collection, and staff responsible for monitoring and data quality
control. The DBMS monitors provision of educational and livelihood services provided to direct
beneficiaries and monitors children’s education and work status. Direct beneficiaries must be
monitored at 6-month intervals and for specified periods of time (throughout the period of service
provision or until the end of the project). Applicants must develop initial indicators to allow them
to monitor the work status of each beneficiary child at 6-month intervals. Applicants must also
develop monitoring guidelines for all project partners responsible for providing direct services to
children and household members and validate monitoring information.
All of the above will be integrated into the Comprehensive Monitoring and Evaluation Plan
(CMEP) and, where necessary, will be refined through the CMEP process (see Section IV). As
part of their strategy to support data collection, Applicants must confirm a commitment to
collaborate with USDOL External Monitoring and Evaluation Experts to develop a CMEP and
carry out implementation evaluations after award, as described in Section IV.
7. Promoting transparency and accountability
Given that transparency and accountability are key components of the U.S. Global Development
Policy and long-term sustainability of efforts to combat child labor, the Applicant should explain
how its proposed project will promote transparency and accountability, including by holding
public meetings to present project results to key stakeholders, including teachers, children and
parents. The Applicant is encouraged to use innovative tools and participatory approaches to
ensure transparency and accountability.11
E. Requirements
1. Pre-application
a) Desk Review
Applicants are strongly encouraged to read the Afghanistan section of the U.S. Department of
Labor’s 2011 Findings on the Worst Forms of Child Labor Report (TDA),
http://www.dol.gov/ilab/programs/ocft/PDF/2011TDA.pdf and U.S. Department of Labor’s
2012 List of Goods Produced by Child Labor or Forced Labor (TVPRA),
http://www.dol.gov/ilab/programs/ocft/PDF/2012TVPRA.pdf. Applicants must demonstrate
an understanding of child labor, labor law, labor rights, and working conditions in
Afghanistan. Applicants must demonstrate an understanding of relevant international labor
conventions.
b) Proposal Research:
The Applicant should carry out preliminary research on the prevalence and nature of child
labor in the Afghan carpet supply chain, from the production of wool to the sale of carpets in
the market in a minimum of one targeted district in Afghanistan. The research should inform
project design and determine relevant and effective interventions. If preliminary in-country
research is conducted it will serve as a basis for a more detailed baseline assessment to be
conducted post-award.

11 U.S. Government, Fact Sheet: U.S. Global Development Policy, September 22, 2010; available from
http://www.whitehouse.gov/the-press-office/2010/09/22/fact-sheet-us-global-development-policy.
Solicitation for Cooperative Agreement 13-11 Page 9 of 36
c) Host Government Consultations
USDOL has informed host government officials of the proposed award. Applicants must
consult with the Government of the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan to ensure that their
proposed strategies are relevant to the country’s needs and supportive of the Government’s
efforts to address child labor. Applicants should discuss proposed interventions, strategies,
and activities with host government officials and work cooperatively with government
stakeholders at the national and/or local level, including relevant ministries or government
bodies, during the preparation of their applications and in developing project interventions.
Efforts should be made to avoid duplication, enhance collaboration, and develop synergies
with government efforts. Applicants should seek opportunities to coordinate and/or
collaborate, as appropriate, with relevant government agencies/ministries at the national,
regional, and local level, including the following:
 MOLSAMD;
 Ministry of Women’s Affairs;
 Ministry of Education;
 Ministry of Commerce and Industries; and
 Ministry of Rural Rehabilitation and Development’s Community Development Councils
and/or local village shura.
2. Post-Award
Grantees must comply with the following post-award requirements. Grantees must adhere to all
of the post-award requirements outlined in the Management and Procedures Guidelines (MPG)
and summarized below.
a) Project Document
The Grantee(s) is required to carry out a review of the project strategy and project budget
included in their proposal and produce a project document, in consultation with OCFT, within
three months of award. Operating within the scope of the approved proposal, the Grant
Officer’s Representative (GOR) will be involved in the development, review and approval of
the project document. The final project document (which may include refinements to the
project strategy/budget) is subject to final approval by the GOR and the GO. Following that
review process, if further refinement of the project strategy or budget are determined to be
needed by the Grantee(s) or OCFT, the Grantee(s) will be required to consult with the GOR
in preparing and then submitting a modification to the GO proposing refinements to the
project strategy and budget.
b) Subgrants and Subcontracts
Subgrants and subcontracts awarded after the cooperative agreement is signed, and not
proposed in the application, must be awarded through a formal competitive bidding process
(for subcontracts, this is in accordance with 29 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 95.40-48).
Subgrants and subcontracts are subject to audit.
Solicitation for Cooperative Agreement 13-11 Page 10 of 36
F. Project Deliverables
Grantees must provide the following project deliverables by the specified deadlines provided.

12 All deadlines specified therein refer to calendar days. If a particular calendar day falls on a weekend or holiday the deadline
will refer to the following business day.
DELIVERABLE DEADLINE12 SUBMIT TO
Negotiated Indirect Cost Rate
Agreement Proposal.
Submit within 90 days of award;
Actual Costs: submitted within 6 months of
award
Cognizant Agency
Project Document. Within 90 days of award GOR
Federal Financial Report (FFR)
Standard Form (SF) 425.
Quarterly: January 30, April 30, July 30,
October 30
E-grants
Technical Progress Report (TPR),
with all required attachments
including the government
subaward table, common indicators
(see Appendix B), updated work
plan, as described in the MPG.
Semi-annually: April 30 and October 30 GOR
Contact information for Grantee
provided to USDOL, including
name, address, phone and email of
point of contact at Grantee
headquarters and in the project
country(ies).
Within 30 days of award GOR
Written notification that key
personnel have begun to work on
the project.
Within 45 days of award GOR
Government Subaward Matrix
(see MPG for sample matrix).
Within 4 months of award and
subsequently if additional government
subawards are being proposed. Grantees
must adhere to requirements on government
subawards provided in the Cooperative
Agreement and MPG.
GOR
Strategy for promoting
sustainability.
Grantee Baseline survey initiated.
Within 7 months of award GOR
CMEP finalized, through
collaboration between Grantee,
USDOL, and USDOL’s M&E
contractor.
Within 9 months of award GOR
Baseline survey report package. Within 12 months of award GOR
Review of project strategy based
on baseline survey report
conducted within 4 weeks of
completing the baseline report.
Project Revision Request submitted
to USDOL, if necessary, to revise
the project strategy.
Within 13 months of award GOR
Endline survey begun. At least 4 to 6 months prior to the end of
the Cooperative Agreement period
GOR
Endline survey report package. At least 1 month prior to the end of the
Cooperative Agreement
GOR
Solicitation for Cooperative Agreement 13-11 Page 11 of 36
G. Required Staffing
1. Key Personnel
Key personnel positions are deemed essential to the successful operation of the project and
completion of all proposed activities and deliverables. USDOL shall retain the authority to
approve all key personnel changes throughout the life of the cooperative agreement. Key
personnel must allocate 100 percent of their time to the project and live in the country where the
project is being implemented. Applicants are required to ensure that all proposed key personnel
will be available to staff the project within 45 days of award should the Applicant be selected for
award. (See Section IV.B.1.d)(4) for additional details). Proposed key personnel candidates must
sign letters indicating their commitment to serve on the project for a stated term of service and
their availability to commence work within 45 days of cooperative agreement award. USDOL
encourages Applicants to hire national/local staff for key personnel positions. Key personnel
positions must not be combined.
Applicants must propose candidates with qualifications to successfully implement the proposed
strategy. Applicants must address candidates’ level of competence, past experience relevant to
this solicitation and qualifications to perform the requirements outlined in the Funding
Opportunity Description and the Project Intervention proposed by the Applicant.
The Grantee(s) must assume full responsibility for ensuring that all key personnel have a clear
and thorough understanding of USDOL policies, procedures, and requirements and that all
documents submitted to USDOL are in fluent English. The application will be considered nonresponsive and rejected if any key personnel candidates are not designated.
USDOL has designated the following position(s) as key personnel. Requirements for each
individual position follow:
2. Project Director
 Minimum of five years of experience in project management, supervision, administration,
and implementation of cooperative agreement and/or contract requirements (including
Best practices report, as well as any
other proposed studies,
assessments, and research
activities.
At least 3 month prior to the end of the
Cooperative Agreement
GOR
Government Property Inventory
Disposition Request; inventory list
of all real property and equipment
with an acquisition value of $5,000
or more per unit, and supplies if
aggregate value exceeds $5,000.
Inventory List: Submit 12 months after the
Cooperative Agreement is signed and
subsequently, at any time that additional
real property and equipment are purchased
with project funds. In all cases, a current
Inventory List must be submitted at least
once every two years.
Final Disposition: Submit a final Inventory
List at least 120 days prior to the end of the
Cooperative Agreement period
GO
Closeout Documents Checklist;
Final TPR; Final Quarterly
FFR/SF-425; Closeout Financial
Form; Recipient’s Release Form;
Government Property Closeout
Inventory Certification.
Within 90 days after the end of the
Cooperative Agreement period
GOR
GO
Solicitation for Cooperative Agreement 13-11 Page 12 of 36
meeting deadlines, achieving targets, and overseeing the preparation and submission of
required reports).
 Must be employed by the Grantee (not subgrantees/subcontractors).
 General knowledge of data collection and project M&Es.
 Ability to establish and maintain systems for project operations, including the CMEP required
by USDOL and other M&E requirements.
 Maintains working relationships with all project stakeholders, and engages in coalition
building and public-private partnerships promotion.
 Experience in a leadership role in implementing development projects relevant to this
solicitation.
 Experience working on supply chain monitoring or social compliance for child labor.
 Project Director must reside in Afghanistan throughout the duration of the project.
 Fluency in English is required; working knowledge of Dari and/or Pashtu is preferred.
a) Other Key Personnel
The Applicant must identify other key personnel positions critical to lead overall coordination,
monitoring, and execution of the project strategy. Applicants must include position
descriptions, the expected level of effort, justification for the expected level of effort, and duty
location for each position.
3. Other Professional Personnel
Applicants must identify any other professional program personnel deemed necessary to carry out
the proposed strategy and provide justification for including these individuals. Applicants must
include position descriptions, the expected level of effort, and duty location for each description.
II. AWARD INFORMATION
Award information is provided on the cover page (page 1) of the SCA.
III. ELIGIBILITY INFORMATION
A. Eligible Applicants
Any commercial, international, educational, or non-profit organization(s), including any faith-based,
community-based, or public international organization(s), capable of successfully reducing children’s
participation in child labor, and developing a social compliance system is eligible to apply. Applicants are
expected to apply in partnership with at least one company that produces hand woven carpets from home
based workers in Afghanistan. The partnership with the company may take the form of a subgrant or
subcontract. Applicants must demonstrate a proven ability to develop a social compliance system and
establish a verification system. Organizations applying for this award must demonstrate a proven ability
to manage complex projects in developing countries through actions that support these aims. This SCA is
for the award of a new cooperative agreement with specific project objectives and outcomes as outlined in
this SCA. As such, Applicants may not submit applications to renew or supplement an existing project.
Public International Organizations (PIOs) are eligible to apply. However, USDOL requires that PIOs and
all other entities that elect to apply for this grant opportunity adhere to the specific requirements outlined
in this SCA concerning audits and counter-terrorism. In negotiating an award with a PIO, USDOL will
discuss the inclusion of appropriate language acknowledging the rights and privileges as currently
established and afforded to PIOs by the U.S. Government in accordance with U.S. law.
Applicants and any proposed subgrantees or subcontractors must comply with all audit requirements,
including those established in Office of Management and Budget (OMB) Circular A-133. Applicants
Solicitation for Cooperative Agreement 13-11 Page 13 of 36
must also demonstrate in-country presence -either independently or through a relationship with another
organization with country presence (i.e., a subgrantee or subcontractor) – enabling them to initiate
program activities upon award of the cooperative agreement (see Section IV. Application and Submission
Information).
The following Applicants (including subgrantees/subcontractors) will not be considered:
 Foreign governments and entities that are agencies of, or operated by or for, a foreign
state or government.
 Organizations designated by the U.S. Government to be associated with terrorism or that
have been debarred or suspended.
 Applicants charging a fee (profit) associated with a project funded by USDOL under this
award.
B. Cost Sharing or Matching
No cost share is required (including in-kind contributions or matching fund contributions). However,
USDOL welcomes applications that include cost share. Applicants that propose cost share must indicate
the nature; source(s) of funds and/or in-kind contributions; the amount/estimated value in U.S. dollars;
and the proposed project activities to be performed with these resources. They must also explain how
these activities will complement and enhance project objectives. Grantees will be required to report on
those funds in their quarterly SF-425 and are liable for the full amount of the funds during the life of the
cooperative agreement.
Cost sharing, including funds from subgrantees and/or subcontractors, must be used to support the work
of the project or defray its costs. Applicants may not make the award of a subgrant or subcontract
contingent upon a subgrantee or subcontractor agreeing to provide matching funds.
C. Other
USDOL’s OPS will screen all applications for responsiveness. If deemed non-responsive, the office will
send a letter to the Applicant, indicating the reason for the determination of non-responsiveness.
Applications will be considered non-responsive and will be rejected for any one of the following reasons:
1. Failure to submit timely application by Grants.gov or hard copy via the U.S. Postal Service or other
delivery service, such as Federal Express, DHL, or UPS;
2. Failure to register with and maintain an active account in the System for Award Management
(http://www.sam.gov);
3. Failure to submit both a completed Technical Proposal and a completed Cost Proposal;
4. Failure to include all of the required documents and annexes in the Technical Proposal and Cost
Proposal;
5. Failure to demonstrate country presence;
6. Submission of an application with an accompanying budget that exceeds the ceiling amount as
specified on the cover page (page 1) of the SCA;
7. Failure to include a copy of the opinion letter(s) and a summary of audit findings for all Applicants
and subgrantee/subcontractors providing services related to project intervention strategies (see section
I.D.). For U.S.-based non-profit organizations that are subject to the Single Audit Act, failure to
submit their most recent single audit or to demonstrate compliance with single audit submission
timeframes established in OMB Circular A-133. For non-U.S. based and for-profit entities, failure to
submit opinion letters of the most current independent financial audit and a summary of audit findings
in English. Failure to submit a version in English of the opinion letter(s) and the summary of audit
findings for non-U.S.-based and for-profit subgrantees/subcontractors that will provide services
related to project intervention strategies (see section I.D.). Failure to designate key personnel
Solicitation for Cooperative Agreement 13-11 Page 14 of 36
candidates and failure to include résumés and signed letters of commitment for key personnel
candidates; and
8. Failure to identify in the SCA the name of an “authorized representative” to be contacted regarding
the Applicant’s proposal.
IV. APPLICATION AND SUBMISSION INFORMATION
A. Application Package
All information needed to apply for cooperative agreement funding is included in this solicitation. The
SCA application package and any amendments can be downloaded and viewed from
http://www.grants.gov by referencing the Funding Opportunity Number. In order to view the SCA and
submit applications on Grants.gov, Applicants must download free Pure Edge Viewer software, available
from http://www.grants.gov/Applicants/apply_for_grants.jsp. The full-text version of the SCA is also
available on USDOL/ILAB’s Web site, http://www.dol.gov/ILAB/grants/main.htm. Required forms are
available at http://www.dol.gov/ilab/grants/SGAguidelines.htm.
B. Content and Form of Application Submission
Applications must consist of two separate parts (1) a Technical Proposal and (2) a Cost Proposal. If either
part is missing, the application will be considered non-responsive and will be rejected. Unless specified as
“optional” or “as applicable,” all documents identified in this section must be included in the application
package to be considered complete and responsive. Applicants’ Technical and Cost Proposals must
address the project objectives and requirements outlined in the SCA. Applications must be organized as
outlined below. All pages of the application must be numbered. All required documents (including
annexes) must be submitted in English. Any additional documentation submitted that is not required or
specifically requested under this solicitation will not be considered. Applicant’s Technical Proposal must
be nor more than 50 single-sided, double-spaced pages (8-1/2” x 11” with 1” margins). Font sizes should
be no less than 12-point Times New Roman. The Abstract, Table of Contents and required annexes to the
Technical Proposal so not count toward the page limit.
1. Technical Proposal
Applicants must prepare a technical proposal as Part I of the application. The Technical Proposal
must address the Applicant’s technical capacity to plan and implement the proposed project in
accordance with the provisions of this solicitation. The Technical Proposal must respond to all of
the requirements in the SOW. The Technical Proposal must contain all of the documents outlined
below unless marked as “optional” or “as applicable”. Applications must be no more than 50
single-sided, double-spaced pages (8-1/2” x 11” with 1” margins). Font size should be no less
than 11-point Times New Roman. The Abstract, Table of Contents, and required annexes to the
Technical Proposal do not count toward the page limit.
a) Abstract (Executive Summary)
The Abstract must not exceed two pages and must include: project title; name of the
Applicant; proposed subgrantee(s) or subcontractor(s); summary of the proposed project
design, and key project activities; funding amount requested from USDOL (up to $2 million);
and total dollar value of cost share (if applicable). If using Grants.gov for submission, this
document must be attached under the Mandatory Other Attachment section and labeled
“Abstract.”
b) Table of Contents
The Table of Contents must list all required documents and include their corresponding page
numbers.
Solicitation for Cooperative Agreement 13-11 Page 15 of 36
c) Project Design Narrative
The Project Design Narrative must describe in detail the Applicant’s response to the Funding
Opportunity Description. At minimum, the Project Design Narrative must contain the
following sections:
(1) Background and Problem Statement
This section must not exceed three (3) pages. Applicants must describe in detail the
issues with child labor in home-based carpet weaving workplaces in the target area(s) and
identify significant gaps in terms of research, monitoring, and remediation services that
need to be filled by the project This section should also describe key aspects of the
implementing environment that contribute to child labor and must include a brief
background of the proposed partner company(ies).
(2) Objectives and Expected Outcomes
Applicant must outline a project strategy that fully responds to the project objectives and
requirements discussed in Section I, as well as those identified by the Applicants.
Applicants must also explain how their selected strategy will fill identified gaps and
achieve the objectives and expected outcomes of this SCA. The Applicant must also
describe how the project will address the special needs of girls and how the project will
function and respond to changes in Afghanistan’s complex security environment.
(3) Targets and Partners
Applicants must include the project’s target district(s), and number of proposed
beneficiaries. Applicants must also identify the project’s partners, including which carpet
company(ies) the project will be partner with.
(4) Project Interventions
Section I. includes the list of required project interventions.
(5) CMEP Agreement and M&E Capacity Statement
The CMEP is a tool to integrate and guide the project’s monitoring, evaluating, and
reporting on project progress toward achieving intended results and outcomes. It is also
intended to serve as a management tool and facilitate managing for results. Applicants
must confirm in their proposal their commitment to collaborate with USDOL-funded
External M&E Experts and USDOL in developing the project’s CMEP. Applicants must
also describe, in one page or less, their commitment to M&E and their capacity and
approach to meeting the M&E requirements described in this SCA. These requirements
include baseline and endline surveys, the CMEP, development and implementation of a
DBMS, collaboration on externally conducted midterm and final evaluations,
performance reporting, and a minimum of one outcome-oriented research study.
Applicants may use their own staff, a partner organization, or a sub-contractor to carry
out these activities (or components of these activities) but must describe in the capacity
statement how they will ensure high quality data and deliverables.
(6) Results Framework
The results framework must include inputs, outputs, outcomes, and may also consider
assumptions and external factors that may influence the project. The results framework
must be no longer than two pages and included as an annex. The results framework will
serve as an input into the CMEP and will be refined and finalized during that process. For
a template and example, please see the MPG.
(7) Work Plan
The work plan must identify major project activities, deadlines for completing these
Solicitation for Cooperative Agreement 13-11 Page 16 of 36
activities, and person(s) or institution(s) responsible for completing these activities for the
entire life of the project. The work plan must be included as an annex and correspond to
activities identified in the logic model and the project design narrative. Applicants may
choose an appropriate format for their work plan.
d) Organizational Capacity
This section must describe the qualifications of the proposed Applicant and/or any proposed
subgrantees and/or subcontractors to implement the project.
(1) International and U.S. Government Grant and/or Contract Experience
Applicants must describe any experience they have with implementing projects relevant
to the Funding Opportunity Description stated objective of this SCA and provide
references for past performance (no more than a total of six (6) references/projects, see
Appendix C for a sample format). Applicants should prioritize submission of references
related to the objectives of the project. References should be included for all of the
Applicants and subawardees providing services related to project intervention strategies
(see Section I.D.). Projects included in the table must have been active within five years
of the issuance date of the SCA.
(2) Country Presence and Host Government Support
Applicants must address their organization’s current or past experience working in
Afghanistan, existing presence and ability to start up project activities in the target area(s)
upon signing a cooperative agreement. Applicants should also discuss their ability to
work directly with relevant government agencies and NGOs, including local
organizations and community based organizations, and their past experience working
with these stakeholders. Applicants must submit supporting documentation, which
demonstrates country presence and outreach to the host government (including the
Ministry of Labor and any ministries from which the host government requires approval
to implement technical cooperation efforts related to this solicitation) and/or relevant
NGOs.
Any documents that demonstrate country presence and corroborate host government
support may be included as an Annex to the Technical Proposal. This Annex will not
count towards the page limit. Documentation may include official registration of the
Applicant’s organization in Afghanistan, current Memorandum of Understanding
between the Applicant and the host government, and letters of support for the proposed
project from the national and/or local governments.
(3) Project Management Plan
Applicants must discuss their project management plan. It must include a narrative
description of the structure of the project’s management team, key personnel roles and
responsibilities and the lines of authority between key personnel and other project staff
directly responsible for providing direct services related to project intervention strategies.
If any of the project’s personnel would be employed by a subgrantee/subcontractor, the
Applicant must provide a rationale for this arrangement and an explanation of the staffing
structure.
Applicants must also include, as an annex, a project management organization chart that
provides a visual depiction of the project’s management structure and lines of authority
among all key personnel, other professional personnel, and other project staff being
proposed. Applicants may choose an appropriate format for their project management
organization chart.
(4) Personnel
Solicitation for Cooperative Agreement 13-11 Page 17 of 36
Applicants must include, as an annex, signed letters of commitment from all proposed
key personnel indicating their commitment to serve on the project. Applicants must
include a one-page personnel description outlining roles and responsibilities for each key
personnel and professional personnel position specified in their proposal. Applicants
must also submit a one page résumé for all key personnel and other professional
personnel being proposed by the Applicant. Each résumé must include:
 Educational background, including highest education level attained;
 Work experience covering at least the last five years of employment to the present,
including such information as the employer name, position title, clearly defined duties,
and dates of employment;
 Special experience, capabilities, or qualifications related to the candidate’s ability to
implement the proposed strategy and perform effectively in the proposed position; and
 English and Dari and/or Pashtu language skills (speaking, listening, reading, writing).
(5) Audit Report(s)
The Applicant’s Technical Proposal, submitted as an annex, must contain a copy of the
opinion letter(s) and a summary of audit findings for the Applicant and all subgrantees/
subcontractors providing services related to project intervention strategies. The Applicant
must include a cover sheet for its audit attachments. The following audit attachments are
required, depending on the organization’s status:
 For Applicants from U.S.-based non-profit organizations and all proposed U.S.-
based, non-profit, subgrantees and/or subcontractors that are subject to the Single
Audit Act, Applicants must include the summary of audit findings and opinion letter
of the most recent single audit and demonstrate compliance with single audit
submission timeframes established in OMB Circular A-133.
 Non-U.S. based and for-profit Applicants must submit an English version of opinion
letters and a summary of audit findings from their most current independent financial
audit report.
 For all proposed subgrantees and/or subcontractors that are for-profit or non-U.S.-
based organizations, Applicants must submit for these organizations English versions
of the summary of their audit findings and opinion letters for their most current
independent financial audit.
 Upon request, Applicants/Grantees will be required to submit full audit reports and/or
official translations of audit reports.
2. Cost Proposal
Applicants must prepare a cost proposal as Part II of the application. Applicants must describe
their financial management systems and professional expertise to plan and implement the
proposed strategy in accordance with the provisions of this solicitation. Applicants must provide a
narrative description and supporting documentation that demonstrate their organization has a
sound financial system in place to effectively manage the funds requested under this solicitation.
The cost proposal must reflect consistency between the proposed costs and the work to be
performed as outlined in the project design narrative of the Applicant’s technical proposal. The
cost proposal must contain the following: (1) an SF-424 Supplemental Key Contacts Information;
(2) an SF-424 Application for Federal Assistance; (3) an SF-424A Budget Information; (4) a
detailed outputs-based budget and an accompanying budget narrative; (5) an indirect cost form
and supporting documentation; and (6) cost sharing information, if applicable.
Solicitation for Cooperative Agreement 13-11 Page 18 of 36
a) Dun and Bradstreet (DUNS) Number(s)
Applicants must include their unexpired DUNS number in the organizational unit section of
Block 8 of the Standard Form SF-424. Applicants proposing subgrantees or subcontractors
must submit each organization’s DUNS number as an attachment to the Cost Proposal.
Organizations that do not have a DUNS number can receive a DUNS number at no cost by
calling the dedicated toll-free number request line at 1-866-705-5711 or by using the webbased form available at http://fedgov.dnb.com/webform. Registration is brief and can be
completed immediately when requested by phone, or within 1-2 business days when requested
through the webform.
A DUNS number is required to register with the System for Award Management (SAM), a
new Web site that consolidates government procurement systems. If the Applicant has
previously registered with the Central Contractor Registration and has an active record, the
Applicant will have an active record in SAM. If the Applicant(s) needs to update or renew its
record(s) in SAM, it will need to create a SAM user account and link it to the migrated
Applicant record(s). Online registration for SAM is available through its home page
http://1.usa.gov/XH7cyD. For additional information about DUNS number and SAM, please
consult the Federal Desk Service at http://1.usa.gov/UxywPd.
b) Required Standard Forms
SF-424 Supplemental Key Contacts Information: This form must include name, position
title, address, telephone and fax numbers, e-mail address, and other relevant information for
the Applicant’s designated key contact person.
SF-424 Application for Federal Assistance: This form must reflect the entire amount of
funds being requested under this solicitation and if applicable, the amount of any cost sharing
proposed by the Applicant must be shown in Section 18.b.
SF-424A Budget Information (Non Construction Programs): This form must include all
costs for proposed activities. If applicable, in line 6 Applicants must include construction
activities that are: 1) over $5,000; and/or 2) for the construction of a permanent structure
(latrines, wells).
c) Outputs-Based Budget
The Cost Proposal must include a summary outputs-based budget, along with specific outputsbased budgets for each Applicant and proposed subgrantee/subcontractor. The outputs-based
budget must correspond to the SF 424 and SF 424A. The outputs-based budget (including
USDOL funds and any cost sharing funds reported on the SF-424 and SF-424A) must comply
with Federal cost principles. Allowable costs include those specifically defined in 2 CFR Part
230. The budget will become part of the cooperative agreement in the event of award and any
costs omitted by the Applicant may not be allowed to be included after award. Applicants may
not rely on other contracts, grants, or awards to implement the Applicant’s proposed strategy.
The budget submitted with the application must include all necessary funds to implement the
proposed project strategy. USDOL will not provide any additional funding to cover
unanticipated costs.
The detailed Outputs-Based must present costs in a manner that is linked to activities,
objectives, and outputs reflected in the project design narrative, work plan, and results
framework and demonstrate cost-effective allocation of project funds. In addition, it must
provide a breakdown of total administrative costs into direct and indirect administrative costs
Solicitation for Cooperative Agreement 13-11 Page 19 of 36
and allocate the largest proportion of project resources to direct intervention rather than to
direct and indirect administrative costs.13
Applicants must use the following guidance in preparing their Outputs-Based Budget:
Travel
 Allocate sufficient funds to finance appropriate in-country and international travel.
 Allocate funds for:
o Travel by the Project Director and/or another key personnel staff member to
Washington, D.C. to attend a post-award meeting (New Grantee Orientation), which
will be held within two months of award.
o Travel by the Project Director and/or other key personnel based in the field to meet
annually with USDOL officials in Washington, D.C. or another site determined by
USDOL.
Project M&E
All USDOL funded projects must allocate funds to cover the costs associated with project
monitoring and evaluation activities.
Projects with a total project budget less than $6.5 million must adhere to the following
guidelines:
 Set aside at least three percent (3%) of the project budget to cover the costs associated
with project monitoring activities. This three percent should be included as its own line
item/category within the outputs-based budget. On the Standard Form 424A, this amount
can be included in budget category “6h-other”. Allocations associated with project
monitoring must cover:
 The development and implementation of DBMS.
 Regular collection and processing of monitoring data for project beneficiaries at the
child and the household level, including any necessary travel to monitor the work status
of each beneficiary.
 The development of monitoring guidelines (in multiple languages, as appropriate) for all
project partners responsible for providing direct services to children and members of their
households.
 The development and implementation of a system and process for validating monitoring
information.
 Support to the CMEP process including support for two CMEP workshops, costs of
hosting workshops (meeting rooms, etc.), training partners, and any other
logistical/administrative costs (please see Section VI. Award Administration Information).
 Meeting reporting requirements as discussed in the SCA.
 Allocate at least $70,000 to support the external interim and final implementation
evaluations. Resources permitting, USDOL will directly contract the external evaluators to
design and implement the evaluations. However, the project will be responsible for certain
support costs for each evaluation such as translation of the evaluation report from
English into the local language, providing ground transportation for the external evaluator,
hosting an evaluation stakeholders meeting, and in-country transportation and
accommodation costs for staff and other stakeholders’ participation in the meeting.
 Allocate a sufficient amount of funds for conducting a baseline survey, a follow-up
survey, a needs assessment on school conditions, and a research dissemination
strategy, as well as any other proposed studies, assessments, and research activities
(see Section VI. Award Administration Information).

13 The Grant Officer reserves the right to negotiate project and administrative cost levels before award
Solicitation for Cooperative Agreement 13-11 Page 20 of 36
Note: Costs associated with M&E personnel should be included under the personnel line item
and not be included in this budget section.
Single Audits/Attestation Engagements
 Include costs for single audits as direct or indirect costs, whichever is appropriate, in
accordance with the cost allocation procedures approved by the U.S. Federal Cognizant
Agency (FCA).
 Attestation engagements are conducted at USDOL’s expense to supplement the coverage
provided by the single audits that Grantees are required to arrange. There should be no
costs included in the budget for attestation engagements.
Allowance for Unforeseen Costs
 Applicants must include five percent of the project’s total direct costs to address
unforeseen circumstances beyond the Grantee’s control that affect specific budget lines
related to:
o Inflation affecting specific project costs
o United Nations System or foreign government-mandated salary scale or benefits
revisions
o Exchange rate fluctuations.
USDOL also recognizes that certain unforeseen circumstances may arise and result in a need
for exceptions to these uses of Allowance for Unforeseen Costs funds and a need for budget
modifications or time extensions. These include (1) changes in a country’s security
environment; (2) natural disasters; (3) civil or political unrest/upheavals or government
transitions; or (4) delays related to loss of or damage to project property. Use of these funds
must be approved by the GO. The MPG gives guidelines for requesting approval of a budget
modification to re-allocate funds under the Allowance for Unforeseen Costs budget line, as
well as guidance on the timeline by which such re-allocations should be completed.
Value Added Tax (VAT)
 Applicants must include costs related to VAT. If VAT costs are applied by the host
government but are omitted in an Applicant’s budget, the Grantee will be responsible for
paying them. USDOL-funding cannot be used for VAT costs that were not included in the
initial budget proposal.
Housing
 If included in the budget, provide in the budget narrative a justification for any proposed
housing costs, housing allowances, and/or personal living expenses.
Other Allowable Costs
 Training or meetings and conferences where the primary purpose is the dissemination of
technical information may include reasonable costs of meals and refreshments,
transportation, rental of facilities and other incidentals.
d) Budget Narrative
The cost proposal must include a budget narrative that corresponds to the outputs-based
budget. The budget narrative must include a detailed justification, broken down by line item,
of all of the Applicant’s costs included in the outputs-based budget.
e) Indirect Cost Information
According to Federal regulations, indirect costs are those that have been incurred for common
or joint objectives and cannot be readily identified with a particular final cost objective.
Indirect cost charges should be based on allowable, allocable, and reasonable costs based on
Solicitation for Cooperative Agreement 13-11 Page 21 of 36
the applicable cost principles.14 Indirect cost support for allocated charges to the grant and the
closeout process is validated using a federally approved Negotiated Indirect Cost Rate
Agreement (NICRA). The NICRA is issued by the FCA based on annual indirect cost proposal
submissions from grantees. Typically, the agency providing the preponderance of direct
Federal funds to the organization is the FCA.
Indirect Cost Form for the Applicant: The cost proposal must contain information on the
Applicant’s indirect costs, using the Indirect Cost Form provided on Grants.gov and on the
USDOL/ILAB’s Web site at http://www.dol.gov/ilab/grants/SGAguidelines.htm.
Indirect Cost Supporting Documentation for Organizations with:
 A current rate approved by the FCA – Please provide a copy of the NICRA in the proposal.
 No budgeted/claimed indirect costs – Please provide a Certificate of Direct Costs. See the
Indirect Cost Form for details and a sample certificate.
Indirect Cost Proposal Submission Requirements for Organizations with:
 An expired rate or a rate never approved by the FCA – For evaluation purposes, applicants
without an approved NICRA must submit an indirect cost rate or ceiling amount that they
propose to be incorporated into the resultant Cooperative Agreement award. An indirect
cost proposal must be submitted to the FCA within 90 days of grant award to establish a
provisional NICRA. This provisional rate may be effective for a period up to two years
until a final NICRA is established.
 A current rate – Indirect cost proposals must be submitted on an annual basis to the FCA to
obtain federally approved NICRAs for the life of the grant, unless the FCA instructs
otherwise. These proposals are based on incurred costs and are due six months after the end
of each fiscal year.
Indirect Cost Ceilings – The proposed/approved NICRA rate, or indirect rate proposed in
response to the SCA for those organizations with no rates approved, will be used to set a
ceiling for indirect costs in the cooperative agreement.
f) Survey on Ensuring Equal Opportunity for Applicants (Optional)
All Applicants are requested, but not required, to complete and include the Survey on Ensuring
Equal Opportunity for Applicants (OMB No. 1890-0014) in their applications; this form is
provided on USDOL/ILAB’s Web site at:
http://www.dol.gov/ilab/grants/SGAguidelines.htm.
C. Submission Dates and Times
All applications must be received by the closing date and time on the cover page of this announcement.
D. Funding Restrictions
All Applicants must adhere to requirements concerning restrictions, unallowable activities, and specific
prohibitions, as identified in 2 CFR Part 230 (OMB Circular A-122), 2 CFR Parts 215 and 220 (OMB A21), 29 CFR Part 95, 29 CFR Part 98, and USDOL/ILAB policies outlined in the MPG, for all USDOLfunded technical cooperation projects. Applicants should take particular note and should adhere to

14 OMB Circular A-122, as codified at 2 CFR Part 230, for non-profit organizations or OMB Circular A-87, as codified at 2
CFR Part 225, for State and local organizations; and OMB Circular A-21 for Educational Institutions. These cost principles
are available at http://www.whitehouse.gov/omb/circulars/index.html. Federal Acquisition Regulations, 48 CFR Part 31, for
for-profit organizations are available at: http://www.arnet.gov/far/.
Solicitation for Cooperative Agreement 13-11 Page 22 of 36
funding restrictions/administrative requirements in the USDOL/ILAB MPG (available on Grants.gov as a
document accompanying this SCA and available on the ILAB Web page at
http://www.dol.gov/ilab/grants/SGAguidelines.htm).
E. Other Submission Requirements
Applications may be submitted in hard copy or electronically via Grants.gov. Applications submitted by
other means, including e-mail, telegram, or facsimile (FAX) will be not be accepted.
1. Electronic Submission
Applicants electing to submit electronically must submit one electronic copy of the complete
application via Grants.gov. Applicants submitting via Grants.gov are responsible for ensuring that
their application is received by Grants.gov by the deadline.
Applicants submitting their application electronically through Grants.gov should note the
following submission instructions: (1) an individual with authority to legally bind the Applicant
must be responsible for submitting the application on Grants.gov, (2) applications submitted
through Grants.gov do not need to be signed manually; the form will automatically affix an
electronic signature for the authorized person identified, and (3) when submitting on Grants.gov,
Applicants must save all attachments as a .doc, .pdf, .txt, or .xls file. If submitted in any other
format, the application bears the risk that compatibility or other issues will prevent USDOL from
considering the application. USDOL will attempt to open the document, but will not take any
“corrective” measures in the event of issues with opening the document. In such cases, the nonconforming application will not be considered for funding.
To avoid unexpected delays that could result in the rejection of an application, Applicants should
immediately initiate and complete the registration steps at
http://www.grants.gov/Applicants/get_registered.jsp as registration can take multiple days to
complete. Applicants should consult the Grants.gov Web site’s Frequently Asked Questions and
Applicant User Guide, available at http://www.grants.gov/help/general_faqs.jsp, and
http://www.grants.gov/assets/ApplicantUserGuide.pdf. Within two business days of application
submission, Grants.gov will send the Applicant two email messages to provide the status of
application progress through the system. The first email, almost immediate, will confirm receipt
of the application by Grants.gov. The second email will indicate the application has both been
successfully submitted and successfully validated or has been rejected due to errors. Only
applications that have been successfully submitted and successfully validated will be considered.
It is the sole responsibility of the Applicant to ensure a timely submission; therefore, sufficient
time should be allotted for submission (two business days), and if necessary, additional time to
address errors and receive validation upon resubmission (an additional two business days for each
ensuing submission). It is important to note that if sufficient time is not allotted and a rejection
notice is received after the due date and time, the application will not be considered.
Applicants can contact the Grants.gov Contact Center at 1-800-518-4726 or support@grants.gov
to obtain assistance with any problems related to using Grants.gov, including difficulties
downloading the application package; software compatibility questions; and questions on how to
assemble electronic application packages. USDOL bears no responsibility for data errors resulting
from transmission or conversion processes.
2. Hardcopy Submissions
Applicants electing to submit hard copies must submit one (1) original, complete application, plus
one (1) copy of the application, along with a CD that includes the Technical and Cost Proposals
saved as .doc, .pdf, .txt, or .xls files. Hard copy applications must be delivered to the address on
the cover page of this announcement. Applicants are encouraged to submit their applications in
advance of the deadline. Applications may be hand delivered or submitted via the U.S. Postal
Service or non-U.S. Postal Service delivery services, such as Federal Express or UPS. Regardless
Solicitation for Cooperative Agreement 13-11 Page 23 of 36
of the type of delivery service selected, Applicants bear the responsibility for timely submission.
The application package must be received at the designated place by the date and time specified
or it will be considered non-responsive and will be rejected. Note: Please be advised that U.S.
mail delivery in the Washington D.C. area can be slow and erratic due to security concerns.
Applicants must consider this when preparing to meet the application deadline.
Any application received at the OPS after the deadline will not be considered unless it is received
before the award is made and:
1. It is determined by the Government that the late receipt was due solely to mishandling by
the Government after receipt at USDOL at the address indicated; and/or
2. It was sent by registered or certified mail not later than the fifth calendar day before the
deadline; or
3. It was sent by U.S. Postal Service Express Mail Next Day Service-Post Office to
Addressee, no later than 5:00 p.m. at the place of mailing two (2) working days,
excluding weekends and Federal holidays, before the deadline.
4. It was sent by non-U.S. Postal Service Next Day Service-carrier facility to Addressee, no
later than 5:00 p.m. at the place of mailing two (2) working days, excluding weekends
and Federal holidays, before the deadline.
The only acceptable evidence to establish the date of mailing of a late application sent by
registered or certified mail is the U.S. Postal Service postmark on the envelope or wrapper and on
the original receipt from the U.S. Postal Service. The only acceptable evidence to establish the
date of mailing of a late application sent by U.S. Postal Service Express Mail Next Day ServicePost Office to Addressee is the date entered by the Post Office clerk on the “Express Mail Next
Day Service-Post Office to Addressee” label and the postmark on the envelope or wrapper on the
original receipt from the U.S. Postal Service. For Applications submitted through other delivery
services such as Federal Express or UPS, the only acceptable evidence to establish the date of the
mailing is the tracking number, which contains detailed information about the mailing.
If the postmark is not legible, an application received after the above closing time and date will be
treated as if mailed late. “Postmark” means a printed, stamped, or otherwise placed impression
(not a postage meter machine impression) that is readily identifiable without further action as
having been applied and affixed by an employee of the U.S. Postal Service on the date of mailing.
Therefore, Applicants should request that the postal clerk place a legible hand cancellation
“bull’s-eye” postmark on both the receipt and the envelope or wrapper.
V. APPLICATION REVIEW INFORMATION
A. Criteria
The criteria outlined below will be used to evaluate applications submitted in response to this solicitation
on the basis of 100 points.
1. Technical Proposal (80 points)
The Technical Proposal will be evaluated based on the extent to which it responds to all of the
requirements outlined in the SCA.
a) Project Design (50 points)
Applicants will be evaluated and rated on (1) the overall quality, effectiveness, relevance, and
clarity of their proposed project design and strategy; (2) the extent to which it responds to all
of the requirements outlined in the SCA; and (3) the extent to which the proposed strategy will
promote long-term sustainability of efforts to contribute to the reduction of child labor in
home-based weaving workplaces. Applicants will be evaluated on each of the following
Solicitation for Cooperative Agreement 13-11 Page 24 of 36
strategic areas from their proposal:
 Technical support to partner company(ies) to establish a social compliance system
 Piloting of an independent third party verification system
 Remediation services for children identified as engaged in child labor
 Supporting research and evaluation on child labor in the Afghanistan carpet sector
 Raising awareness
b) Organizational Capacity (25 points)
Applicants will be evaluated based on the following criteria:
 Demonstrated experience strengthening the capacity of companies to develop social
compliance systems
 Demonstrated ability to develop a third-party verification system
 International and U.S. Government Grant and/or Contract Experience
 Demonstrated experience working in Afghanistan and Host Government Support
 Project Management Plan
 Personnel, including the quality, relevant experience, and demonstrated effectiveness of
proposed staff for implementing the proposed strategy, and the extent to which the staffing
strategy builds the capacity of local staff
 Demonstrated capacity to manage projects of similar type, funding amount, and
complexity
 Demonstrated experience in providing quality technical, administrative, and financial
oversight to subgrantees and subcontractors
2. Cost Proposal (15 points)
The Cost Proposal will be evaluated as to how effective and realistic the proposed costs are and
how the proposed budget is linked to the activities, objectives, and outputs reflected in the Project
Design Narrative and Work Plan:
 A detailed outputs-based budget and accompanying budget narrative
 Cost-sharing information, if applicable
3. Past Performance (10 points)
Information about the Applicant’s past performance, as applicable, will be considered in the
review process. Applicants will be evaluated based on the following:
 Information provided by the Applicant in Appendix C
 Demonstrated ability to meet its project targets under past or current projects funded by
USDOL or other donors
 Quality and timeliness of submitted grant, cooperative agreement, and/or contract deliverables
to USDOL and/or other donors
 Performance of the Applicant’s key personnel on current and past projects with USDOL
and/or other donors
B. Review and Selection Process
Each complete and responsive application will be evaluated by a technical review panel against the
criteria described in this SCA. Applicants are advised that panel recommendations to the GO are advisory
in nature. The GO may elect to select a Grantee on the basis of the initial application submission or the
GO may establish a competitive or technically acceptable range from which a Grantee will be selected. If
deemed appropriate, the GO may call for the preparation and receipt of final revisions of applications,
following which the evaluation process described above, may be repeated, in whole or in part, to consider
such revisions. The GO will make final selection determinations based on panel findings and may
consider other factors that represent the greatest advantage to the Federal Government, including cost, the
availability of funds, and the Applicant’s past performance on Federal awards. USDOL reserves the right
to: (1) solicit information from Federal sources and/or non-Federal sources about the Applicant’s past
Solicitation for Cooperative Agreement 13-11 Page 25 of 36
performance on any awards—including evaluations, audits, attestation engagements, and questionnaires;
(2) assess the Applicant’s past performance on awards with respect to its potential effect on grant
implementation; and (3) consider this information as part of its selection process. If USDOL does not
receive technically acceptable applications in response to this solicitation, it reserves the right to terminate
the competition and not make any award. The GO’s determinations for awards under this solicitation are
final.
Before the actual cooperative agreement is awarded, USDOL may enter into discussions with one or more
Applicants for any reason deemed necessary, including negotiating components of the project
design/strategy; budget; project duration; staffing; funding levels; and financial and administrative
systems in place to support implementation of the cooperative agreement (including relevant issues raised
in submitted audit report(s)). If negotiations do not result in a mutually acceptable submission, the GO
reserves the right to terminate the negotiation and decline to fund the application.
Award of a cooperative agreement under this solicitation may also be contingent upon an exchange of
project support letters between USDOL and the relevant host government ministries.
C. Anticipated Announcement and Award Dates
Information on the anticipated award date is provided on the cover page of the SCA. USDOL is not
obligated to make any awards as result of this solicitation, and only the GO can bind USDOL to the
provision of funds under this solicitation.
VI. AWARD ADMINISTRATION INFORMATION
For the purposes of this solicitation and cooperative agreement awards, the Grantee will be the sole-entity (1) to
act as the primary point of contact with USDOL to receive and respond to all inquiries, communications and
orders under the project; (2) with authority to withdraw or draw down funds through the Department of Health
and Human Services-Payment Management System; (3) responsible for submitting to USDOL all deliverables,
including all technical and financial reports related to the project; (4) that may request or agree to a revision or
amendment of the cooperative agreement or the Project Document; and (5) responsible for working with USDOL
to close out the project. Each Grantee must comply with all applicable Federal regulations and is individually
subject to audit.
A. Award Notices
The GO will notify Applicants of designation results as follows:
Notice of Award: The notice of award signed by the GO serves as official notice of an Applicant’s
designation as Grantee. The notice of award will be accompanied by a cooperative agreement and
USDOL/ILAB’s most current MPG, which is available on Grants.gov (as a document accompanying this
SCA) and the USDOL Web site, http://www.dol.gov/ilab/grants/SGAguidelines.htm. The MPG provides
general management procedures and guidelines for Grant and Cooperative Agreements in areas that may
not be explicitly detailed in the solicitation.
Notice to Unsuccessful Applicants: Applicants not selected for award will be notified formally. They
may submit a written request for debriefing within 10 business days after receipt of notification of nonselection. The GO is not required to provide debriefings if written requests are not received within the
specified timeframe.
Notices by a person or entity other than the GO are not valid.
B. Administrative and National Policy Requirements
1. General Requirements
Solicitation for Cooperative Agreement 13-11 Page 26 of 36
Grantees awarded Federal funding under this SCA shall be subject to the terms outlined in this
solicitation, the cooperative agreement, and the MPG. They are also subject to applicable U.S.
Federal laws (including appropriations laws) and regulations, Executive Orders, applicable OMB
Circulars and USDOL policies. If, during project implementation, a Grantee is found in violation
of any of the foregoing, remedies may include modification of the terms of the cooperative
agreement awarded under this solicitation; disallowance and recovery of costs; termination of the
cooperative agreement; and USDOL any other action permitted by law.
2. Project Audits and External Auditing Arrangements
U.S.-based non-profit Grantees whose total annual expenditure of Federal awards is more than
$500,000 must have an organization-wide audit conducted in accordance with 29 CFR Parts 96
and 99, which codify the requirements of the Single Audit Act and OMB Circular A-133, and
must comply with the timeframes established in those regulations for the submission of their
audits to the Federal Audit Clearinghouse. Grantees must send a copy of each single audit
conducted within the timeframe of the USDOL-funded project to their assigned GOR at the time
it is submitted to the Federal Audit Clearinghouse.
In accordance with 29 CFR Parts 96 and 99, USDOL has contracted with an independent external
auditor to conduct project-specific attestation engagements at USDOL’s expense to supplement
the coverage provided by the annual audits that Grantees are required to arrange, which are
referenced in the preceding paragraph. All Grantees, including U.S.-based and private for-profit
Grantees, are subject to attestation engagements during the life of the cooperative agreement.
Such an attestation engagement will be conducted in accordance with U.S. Government Auditing
Standards, which includes auditors’ opinions on (1) compliance with USDOL regulations and the
provisions of the cooperative agreement and (2) the accuracy and reliability of the Grantee’s
financial and performance reports.
3. Administrative Standards and Provisions
Cooperative agreements awarded under this solicitation are subject to the administrative
standards and provisions that pertain to USDOL, and any other applicable standards that come
into effect during the term of the cooperative agreement. Title 29 of the CFR is available from the
U.S. Government Printing Office, at
http://ecfr.gpoaccess.gov/cgi/t/text/textidx?c=ecfr&sid=5e421ad42692a3a28f382a9aba659b2b&r
gn=div5&view=text&node=29:1.1.1.1.39&idno=29. Copies of all regulations referenced in this
solicitation are available at no cost, online, at http://www.dol.gov.
 29 CFR Part 2 Subpart D – Equal Treatment in Department of Labor Programs for
Religious Organizations; Protection of Religious Liberty of Department of Labor
Social Service Providers and Beneficiaries.
 29 CFR Part 31 – Nondiscrimination in Federally Assisted Programs of the
Department of Labor— Effectuation of Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.
 29 CFR Part 32 – Nondiscrimination on the Basis of Handicap in Programs and
Activities Receiving Federal Financial Assistance.
 29 CFR Part 33 – Enforcement of Nondiscrimination on the Basis of Handicap in
Programs or Activities Conducted by the Department of Labor.
 29 CFR Part 35 – Nondiscrimination on the Basis of Age in Programs or Activities
Receiving Federal Financial Assistance from the Department of Labor.
 29 CFR Part 36 – Nondiscrimination on the Basis of Sex in Education Programs or
Activities Receiving Federal Financial Assistance.
 29 CFR Part 93 – New Restrictions on Lobbying.
 29 CFR Part 94 – Government-wide Requirements for Drug-Free Workplace
(Financial Assistance).
 29 CFR Part 95 – Grants and Agreements with Institutions of Higher Education,
Hospitals and other Non-Profit Organizations, and with Commercial Organizations,
Solicitation for Cooperative Agreement 13-11 Page 27 of 36
Foreign Governments, Organizations Under the Jurisdiction of Foreign Governments,
and International Organizations.
 29 CFR Part 96 – Audit Requirements for Grants, Contracts and Other Agreements.
 29 CFR Part 98 – Government-wide Debarment and Suspension (Non-procurement).
 29 CFR Part 99 – Audits of States, Local Governments, and Non-Profit
Organizations.
Copies of OMB Circulars referenced in this document can be found at:
 2 CFR Parts 215 and 220 (OMB Circular A-21)– Cost Principles for Educational
Institutions
http://www.whitehouse.gov/sites/default/files/omb/fedreg/2005/083105_a21.pdf
 OMB Circular A-110 – Uniform Administrative Requirements for Grants and
Agreements with Institutions of Higher Education, Hospitals, and Other Non-Profit
Organizations http://www.whitehouse.gov/omb/circulars_a110/
 2 CFR Part 230 (OMB Circular A-122)– Cost Principles for Non-Profit
Organizations
http://www.whitehouse.gov/sites/default/files/omb/assets/omb/fedreg/2005/083105_a
122.pdf
 OMB Circular A-133– Audits of States, Local Governments, and Non-Profit
Organizations
http://www.whitehouse.gov/sites/default/files/omb/assets/a133/a133_revised_2007.p
df
4. Transparency
USDOL is committed to conducting a transparent grant award process and publicizing
information about program outcomes. Posting grant applications on public Web sites is a means
of promoting and sharing innovative ideas. For this grant competition, we will publish all
proposal Abstracts on the Department’s public Web site or similar publicly accessible location.
Additionally, we will publish a redacted version of the Technical Proposal required by this
solicitation for all Awardees, on the Department’s Web site or a similar location. Except for the
sections listed above, none of the Attachments to the Technical Proposal described in Section IV
will be published. The Technical Proposals and Abstracts will not be published until after the
cooperative agreements are awarded. In addition, information about Cooperative Agreement
progress and results may also be made publicly available.
USDOL recognizes that grant applications sometimes contain information that an applicant may
consider proprietary or business confidential information, or may contain personally identifiable
information. Proprietary or business confidential information is information that is not usually
disclosed outside your organization and the disclosure of which is likely to cause you substantial
competitive harm. Personally identifiable information is any information that can be used to
distinguish or trace an individual’s identity, such as name, social security number, date and place
of birth, mother‘s maiden name, or biometric records; and any other information that is linked or
linkable to an individual, such as medical, educational, financial, and employment information.15
Abstracts will be published in the form originally submitted, without any redactions. Applicants
should not include any proprietary or confidential business information or personally identifiable
information in this summary. In the event that an Applicant submits proprietary or confidential
business information or personally identifiable information, USDOL is not liable for the posting
of this information contained in the Abstract. The submission of the grant application constitutes
a waiver of the Applicant’s objection to the posting of any proprietary or confidential business

15 Office of Management and Budget, OMB Memorandum 07-16 and 06-19. GAO Report 08-536, Privacy: Alternatives Exist
for Enhancing Protection of Personally Identifiable Information, May 2008; available from
http://www.gao.gov/new.items/d08536.pdf.
Solicitation for Cooperative Agreement 13-11 Page 28 of 36
information contained in the Abstract. Additionally, the Applicant is responsible for obtaining all
authorizations from relevant parties for publishing all personally identifiable information
contained within the Abstract. In the event the Abstract contains proprietary or confidential
business or personally identifiable information, the Applicant is presumed to have obtained all
necessary authorizations to provide this information and may be liable for any improper release of
this information.
By submission of this grant application, the Applicant agrees to indemnify and hold harmless the
United States, USDOL, its officers, employees, and agents against any liability or for any loss or
damages arising from this application. By such submission of this grant application, the Applicant
further acknowledges having the authority to execute this release of liability.
In order to ensure that proprietary or confidential business information or personally identifiable
information is properly protected from disclosure when USDOL posts the winning Technical
Proposals, Applicants whose Technical Proposals will be posted will be requested by the Grant
Office to submit a redacted version of their Technical Proposal, with any proprietary or
confidential business information and personally identifiable information redacted. All non-public
information about the Applicant’s and consortium members’ staff (if applicable) should be
removed as well.
Submission of a redacted version of the Technical Proposal will constitute permission by the
Applicant for USDOL to make the redacted version publicly available. USDOL will also assume
that by submitting the redacted version of the Technical Proposal, the Applicant has obtained the
agreement of all persons and entities whose proprietary, confidential business information, or
personally identifiable information is contained in the Technical Proposal to publish any
unredacted information which fits under either category. If an Applicant fails to provide a
redacted version of the Technical Proposal by the deadline established by USDOL, USDOL will
publish the original Technical Proposal in full, after redacting only personally identifiable
information. (Note that the original, unredacted version of the Technical Proposal will remain
part of the complete application package, including the Applicant’s proprietary and confidential
business information and any personally identifiable information).
Applicants are encouraged to maximize the grant application information that will be publicly
disclosed, and to exercise restraint and redact only information that clearly is proprietary,
confidential commercial/business information, or capable of identifying a person. The redaction
of entire pages or sections of the Technical Proposal is not appropriate, and will not be allowed,
unless the entire portion merits such protection. Should a dispute arise about whether redactions
are appropriate, USDOL will follow the procedures outlined in the Department’s Freedom of
Information Act (FOIA) regulations (29 CFR Part 70).
Redacted information in grant applications will be protected by USDOL from public disclosure in
accordance with federal law, including the Trade Secrets Act (18 U.S.C. § 1905), FOIA, and the
Privacy Act (5 U.S.C. § 552a). If USDOL receives a FOIA request for your application, the
procedures in USDOL’s FOIA regulations for responding to requests for commercial/business
information submitted to the government will be followed, as well as all FOIA exemptions and
procedures. 29 CFR § 70.26. Consequently, it is possible that application of FOIA rules may
result in release of information in response to a FOIA request that an Applicant redacted in its
“redacted copy.”
5. Transparency Act Requirements
Applicants must ensure that they have the necessary processes and systems in place to comply
with the reporting requirements of the Federal Funding Accountability and Transparency Act of
2006 (Pub. Law 109-282, as amended by section 6202 of Pub. Law 110-252). Complete
information on the reporting requirements of the Transparency Act, as described in 2 CFR Part
Solicitation for Cooperative Agreement 13-11 Page 29 of 36
170, Appendix A, can be found at the following Web site:
http://edocket.access.gpo.gov/2010/pdf/2010-22705.pdf.
6. Reporting
Grantees must submit copies of all required reports to USDOL by the specified due dates, unless
otherwise indicated. More information on the reports and exact timeframes for their completion
will be included in the cooperative agreement.
VII. AGENCY CONTACTS
Agency contact information is available on the cover page of the SCA.
VIII. OTHER INFORMATION
A. OMB Information Collection
This SCA requests information from Applicants. This collection of information is approved under 1225-
0086 OMB Information Collection No 1225-0086 (expires January 31, 2016). According to the
Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995, no persons are required to respond to a collection of information
unless such collection displays a valid OMB control number. Public reporting burden for the grant
application is estimated to average 40 hours per response. These estimates include time for reviewing
instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering and maintaining the data needed, completing and
reviewing the collection of information, and drafting the proposal. Each recipient who receives a grant
award will be required to submit semi-annual technical progress reports to ILAB. Each report is estimated
to take approximately 10 hours to prepare. Any comments about the burden estimated or any other aspect
of this collection of information, including suggestions for reducing this burden, should be directed to the
OPS.
This information is being collected for the purpose of awarding a cooperative agreement. The information
collected through this SCA will be used by the USDOL to ensure that cooperative agreements are
awarded to the Applicants best suited to perform the functions of these cooperative agreements.
Submission of this information is required in order for the Applicant to be considered for award of a
cooperative agreement.
B. Privacy Act and FOIA
Any information submitted in response to this solicitation will be subject to the provisions of the Privacy
Act and the FOIA, as appropriate.
IX. APPENDICES
APPENDIX A: TERMS AND DEFINITIONS
“Acceptable work,” while not specifically defined in the ILO Conventions, is work that is performed by children
who are of legal working age, in accordance with national legislation and international standards, namely ILO
Conventions 182 and 138; non-hazardous; non-exploitative; and does not prevent a child from receiving the full
benefit of an education. For example, “acceptable work” would generally include light work that is compatible
with national minimum age legislation and education laws.
“Area-based approach” targets all forms of child labor within a defined geographic location.
A “Child” or “children” are individuals under the age of 18 years. For the purposes of this solicitation, this term
Solicitation for Cooperative Agreement 13-11 Page 30 of 36
also includes older children (“youth”) who are under the age of 18 years.
“Child labor” includes those children (minors under age 18) working in the worst forms of child labor as outlined
in ILO Convention 182 and children engaged in work that is exploitative and/or interferes with their ability to
participate and complete required years of schooling, in line with ILO Convention 138. ILO Convention 182
defines the WFCL as:
(a) all forms of slavery or practices similar to slavery, such as the sale and trafficking of children, debt
bondage and serfdom and forced or compulsory labor, including forced or compulsory recruitment of
children for use in armed conflict;
(b) the use, procuring or offering of a child for prostitution, the production of pornography or for
pornographic performances;
(c) the use, procuring or offering of a child for illicit activities, in particular for the production and trafficking
of drugs as defined in the relevant international treaties; and
(d) work which, by its nature or the circumstances in which it is carried out, is likely to harm the health,
safety or morals of children.
Grantee(s) are encouraged to consult Recommendation 190 accompanying C. 182 for additional guidance on
identifying hazardous forms of work. According to ILO Convention 182, hazardous work “shall be determined by
national laws or regulations or by the competent authority, after consultation with the organizations of employers
and workers concerned, taking into consideration relevant international standards…” As this suggests, forms of
work identified as “hazardous” for children [Article 3(d)] may vary from country to country. ILO
Recommendation No. 190, which accompanies ILO Convention 182, gives additional guidance on identifying
“hazardous work.” ILO Recommendation No. 190 states in Section II, Paragraph 3 that, “[i]n determining the
types of work referred to under Article 3(d) of the Convention [ILO Convention 182], and in identifying where
they exist, consideration should be given, inter alia to:
(a) work which exposes children to physical, psychological, or sexual abuse;
(b) work underground, under water, at dangerous heights or in confined spaces;
(c) work with dangerous machinery, equipment and tools, or which involves the manual handling or transport
of heavy loads;
(d) work in an unhealthy environment which may, for example, expose children to hazardous substances,
agents or processes, or to temperatures, noise levels, or vibrations damaging to their health;
(e) work under particularly difficult conditions such as work for long hours or during the night or work where
the child is unreasonably confined to the premises of the employer.
ILO Recommendation No. 190 goes on to state in Paragraph 4 that, “[f]or the types of work referred to under
Article 3(d) of the Convention and Paragraph 3 above, national laws or regulations or the competent authority
could, after consultation with the workers’ and employers’ organizations concerned, authorize employment or
work as from the age of 16 on condition that the health, safety and morals of the children concerned are fully
protected, and that the children have received adequate specific instruction or vocational training in the relevant
branch of activity.”
“Child labor monitoring system” CLMS involves the identification, referral, protection, and prevention of
exploitative child labor through the development of a coordinated multi-sector monitoring and referral process
that aims to cover all children living in a given geographical area.
Progress in this field can be demonstrated if one or several of the following systems has been established:
 A comprehensive plan and/or pilot program to develop and establish national, local or sector specific
CLMS.
 A CLMS covering various forms of child labor at the national level;
 A CLMS covering various forms of child labor at the local level:
 A CLMS in any formal or informal sector, urban or rural.
Solicitation for Cooperative Agreement 13-11 Page 31 of 36
A comprehensive and credible CLMS includes the following characteristics:
 The system is focused on the child at work and/or in school;
 It involves all relevant partners in the field, including labor inspectors if appropriate;
 It uses regular, repeated observations to identify children in the workplace and determine risks to which
they are exposed;
 It refers identified children to the most appropriate alternative to ensure that they are withdrawn from
dangerous work;
 It verifies whether the children have actually been removed and/or shifted from dangerous work to an
appropriate situation (school or other);
 It tracks these children after their removal, to ensure that they have satisfactory alternatives; and
 It keeps records on the extent and nature of child labor and the schooling of identified child workers.
Children at high-risk of entering child labor refers to children who experience a set of conditions or circumstances
(family environment or situation, proximity to economic activities prone to employ children, etc.) under which the
child lives or to which the child is exposed that make it more likely that the child will be employed in child labor
(e.g. siblings of working children). The definition of high-risk should be defined by the project and used in the
baseline survey.
“Cooperative agreement” an award instrument where substantial involvement is anticipated between the donor
(USDOL) and the Grantee(s) during the performance of project activities. The level of monitoring and
accountability required by USDOL under a cooperative agreement is less than what is required under a contract,
but more than what is required under a regular grant.
“Corporate Social Responsibility” is a broad concept intended to cover how companies integrate social and
environmental concerns into their operations and their interactions with stakeholders aside from legal
requirements.
“Cost sharing” means any method by which the Grantee(s) accomplishes the work of the grant, or work that
supports or enhances the goals of the grant, with funds or other things of value, obtained from the Grantee(s)
and/or non-Federal third parties. These methods may include “matching funds” and “in-kind contributions”.
“Direct beneficiaries” are children and households that have been provided with educational and livelihood
services.
“Direct educational services” may involve either of the following:
The provision of goods and/or services (if lack thereof is a barrier to education) that meets direct beneficiaries’
specific needs and results in their enrollment in at least one of the four categories of educational activities listed
below. Examples of goods and/or services that may meet the specific gaps/educational needs of targeted children
include tutoring, school meals, uniforms, school supplies and materials, books, tuition and transportation
vouchers, or other types of non-monetary incentives.
The four categories of educational activities that qualify are:
 Non-formal or basic literacy education- This type of educational activity may include transitional,
leveling, or literacy classes so that a child may either be mainstreamed into formal education and/or can
participate in vocational training activities;
 Vocational, pre-vocational, or skills training- This type of training is designed to develop a particular,
marketable skill (i.e., mechanics, sewing);
 Formal education – This is defined as the formal school system within the select country; or
 Mainstreaming – This type of educational activity involves transitioning children from non-formal
education into the formal education system. Generally, mainstreaming involves the provision of goods
and/or services that may assist in placement testing and enable a child to attend and stay in school.
Solicitation for Cooperative Agreement 13-11 Page 32 of 36
OR
The direct provision of at least one of the following two educational activities by the project to its direct
beneficiaries:
 Non-formal or basic literacy education; or
 Vocational, pre-vocational, or skills training.
Grantee(s) must be able to match a particular service or educational or training opportunity to an individual child.
Therefore, project interventions such as infrastructure improvements to schools and other learning environments,
teacher training, construction of latrines, inclusion of child labor modules in teacher curriculum, or the provision
of classroom chalkboards are not considered “direct educational services” as defined above (see definition of
“other project interventions”).
“Direct services” are interventions that include educational and livelihood services provided by the project.
“Educational services” refers to formal or non-formal education:
 Formal education services refer to education provided and/or recognized by the government. Formal
education may include government schools, private schools, religious schools, etc. The support of formal
education may involve the provision of goods and/or services including direct costs such as school fees and
teaching and learning materials and indirect costs such as school uniforms, transportation costs, etc. These
goods and/or services are intended to ensure that the child will attend and stay in school.
 Non-formal education services refer to education provided by any organization or body outside of the
formal school system. This education may include literacy, mainstreaming education, accelerated learning,
community-based education, bridge courses, remedial education, life skills, etc. Non-formal education
services may lead to mainstreaming into formal education or equivalent school certificates.
 Vocational education services refer to education and/or training related to a specific vocation, trade or
occupation. For the purposes of a project(s) funded under this solicitation, a child under the age of 18 who
receives vocational education services will be counted as having received an educational service. Vocational
education services may also be provided to individuals 18 years of age and older in a household, including
older siblings of working or at-risk children under the age of 18, if the provision of such services is intended
to reduce the likelihood of child labor for a child in that household as a result of improvements to the
household’s livelihood. In such cases, the Grantee(s) will report this vocational service to DOL as a livelihood
service provided by the project.
“Hazardous work” The worst forms of child labor referred to in Article 3(d) of Convention 182 are known as
“hazardous work.” According to ILO Convention 182, hazardous work “shall be determined by national laws or
regulations or by the competent authority, after consultation with the organizations of employers and workers
concerned, taking into consideration relevant international standards…” As this suggests, forms of work identified
as “hazardous” for children [Article 3(d)] may vary from country to country. ILO Recommendation No. 190,
which accompanies ILO Convention 182, gives additional guidance on identifying “hazardous work.” ILO
Recommendation No. 190 states in Section II, Paragraph 3 that, “[i]n determining the types of work referred to
under Article 3(d) of the Convention [ILO Convention 182], and in identifying where they exist, consideration
should be given, inter alia to:
a. work which exposes children to physical, psychological, or sexual abuse;
b. work underground, under water, at dangerous heights or in confined spaces;
c. work with dangerous machinery, equipment and tools, or which involves the manual handling or transport
of heavy loads;
Solicitation for Cooperative Agreement 13-11 Page 33 of 36
d. work in an unhealthy environment which may, for example, expose children to hazardous substances,
agents or processes, or to temperatures, noise levels, or vibrations damaging to their health;
e. work under particularly difficult conditions such as work for long hours or during the night or work where
the child is unreasonably confined to the premises of the employer.”
ILO Recommendation No. 190 goes on to state in Paragraph 4 that, “[f]or the types of work referred to under
Article 3(d) of the Convention and Paragraph 3 above, national laws or regulations or the competent authority
could, after consultation with the workers’ and employers’ organizations concerned, authorize employment or
work as from the age of 16 on condition that the health, safety and morals of the children concerned are fully
protected, and that the children have received adequate specific instruction or vocational training in the relevant
branch of activity.”
“Household” consists of all persons—related family members and all unrelated persons—who occupy a housing
unit and have no other usual address. For the purposes of this project a household must include at least one
eligible child who is “at high-risk of entering child labor” or “engaged in child labor.”
“Indirect beneficiaries” are individuals who may benefit from “other direct services” and/or “other project
interventions” provided by the project but who do not receive a “direct educational service.” Such individuals
would not qualify as direct beneficiaries.
“In-Kind contributions” means goods or services, committed to the project by the Grantee(s) and/or a nonFederal third party. A Grantee will be responsible for obtaining such goods or services from the third party and
applying them to the work of the grant. Failure to do so may result in USDOL’s disallowance of costs in the
amount of the committed in-kind contributions.
“Key stakeholders” can include, but are not limited to: parents, educators, community leaders, national policy
makers, and key opinion leaders.
“Livelihood” is defined as a means of living, and the capabilities, assets (including both material and social
resources, such as, food, potable water, health facilities, educational opportunities, housing, and time for
participation in the community), and activities required for it. A livelihood encompasses income, as well as social
institutions, gender relations, and property rights required to support and sustain a certain standard of living. It
includes access to and benefits derived from social and public services provided by the state, such as education,
health services, and other infrastructure. Sustainable livelihood programs seek to create long-lasting solutions to
poverty by empowering their target population and addressing their overall well-being. USDOL child labor
elimination projects focus on ensuring that households can cope with and recover from the stresses and shocks
and maintain or enhance present and future capabilities and assets in a way that helps them overcome the need to
rely on the labor of their children to meet basic needs.
“Livelihood services” may include, but are not limited to, the provision or linkage to education and training,
employment services, economic strengthening services, improved access to savings and credit, and social capital
services. Definitions of livelihood services include but are not limited to the following categories:
 Education and training services aim to provide adult participants with the basic skills and knowledge
necessary to benefit from social services, financial services, and higher education. Education and training
services may include the provision or linkage to life skills, leadership training, financial education, and
literacy and numeracy programs. Only adults16 may be counted in this category as receiving education
and training services.
 Improved access to savings and credit aims to mitigate economic shocks by leveling out the income of

16 A legal adult is a person who has attained the age of 18.
Solicitation for Cooperative Agreement 13-11 Page 34 of 36
participants over time. These services may include village savings and loan programs, micro-insurance,
micro-savings, (un)conditional cash transfer programs, health services, food programs, housing, and
initiatives that aim to diversify the income sources of participants. Adults and children may receive these
services.
 Social capital services aim to expand a participant’s connections within and between social networks.
Social capital services may include the provision or linkage to support groups and labor sharing
arrangements. Adults and children may receive social capital services.
 Employment services aim to increase employment, job retention, earnings, and occupational skills of
participants. Employment services may include the provision of or linkage to employment assistance
programs, vocational and business training, business start-up packages, occupational safety and health
training, micro-franchise programs, job placement, apprenticeships and public works programs. Adults
and children of the legal working age may receive employment services.
 Economic strengthening services aim to increase the economic well-being of participants. Economic
strengthening services may include the provision or linkage to micro-credit, productivity transfers, and
cooperatives. Adults and children of the legal working age may receive economic strengthening services.
 Productivity transfers are inputs aimed at improving the productivity and/or efficiency of processes and
may include, for example, training, seeds, fertilizers, fuel, and labor-saving technologies.
 Cooperatives are groups owned and operated by individuals, organizations or businesses for their mutual
benefit. For example, agricultural cooperatives or farmers’ co-op, may provide services, such as training,
to individual farming members; pool production resources (land, machinery) so that members can farm
together; provide members with inputs for agricultural production, such as seeds, fertilizers, and
machinery; and engage in the transformation, distribution, and marketing of farm products.
“Matching Funds” means cash or cash equivalents, committed to the project by the Grantee(s) and/or a nonFederal third party. A Grantee(s) will be responsible for obtaining such funds from the third party and applying
them to the work of the grant. Failure to do so may result in USDOL’s disallowance of costs in the amount of the
committed matching funds.
“Monitoring and evaluation” According to the 2011 USAID Evaluation Policy, monitoring and evaluation
consists of two basic components —performance monitoring and evaluation— each of which serve distinct
purposes. Performance monitoring of changes in performance indicators reveals whether desired results are
occurring and whether implementation is on track. In general, the results measured are the direct and near-term
consequences of project activities. Evaluation is the systematic collection and analysis of information about the
characteristics and outcomes of programs and projects as a basis for judgments, to improve effectiveness, and/or
inform decisions about current and future programming.
“Occupational safety and health” encompasses issues related to safe and healthy working environments and
efforts to prevent occupational injuries, diseases, and deaths.
“Other direct services” are (1) considered essential for ensuring reduction of children in child labor and (2)
provided directly to the project’s direct beneficiaries. Some examples of “other direct services” would include
extracurricular activities during school breaks; and psychosocial counseling or medical care (e.g., for children
withdrawn from commercial sexual exploitation, child soldiering). Another example would be providing direct
beneficiaries who meet minimum age requirements for employment (particularly children 15-17 years) with
occupational safety and/or health interventions that promote safe, acceptable work (e.g., protective masks,
goggles, gloves) or job placement services to facilitate children’s transition from a vocational or skills training
program into acceptable work. If the project provides children with one or more “other direct services” but does
not provide them with a “direct educational service,” then the project cannot count these children as “direct
Solicitation for Cooperative Agreement 13-11 Page 35 of 36
beneficiaries.” However, such children may be considered “indirect beneficiaries.”
“Quality education” defined by UNESCO in its paper Defining Quality in Education recognizes five dimensions
of quality: learners, environments, content, processes and outcomes, founded on ‘the rights of the whole child,
and all children, to survival, protection, development and participation’ (UNICEF, 2000).
“Social compliance system” is one component of a company’s broader corporate social responsibility,
sustainability or accountability program. A social compliance system is an integrated set of policies and practices
through which a company seeks to ensure maximum adherence to its code of conduct.
“Social protection programs” include government interventions that seek to mitigate the impact of economic
shocks, promote equity, and reduce poverty by providing social assistance to vulnerable populations. They can
include cash transfers, microloans, health insurance, scholarships, savings, vocational training, and temporary
jobs. Some USDOL-funded projects have worked with governments to include project beneficiaries in social
protection programs, provide project services to social protection beneficiaries or conduct joint initiatives to
combat child labor within the social-protection programs’ framework.
“Supply chain” is the chain that is comprised of all organizations and individuals involved in producing,
processing, trading, transporting and/or distributing a product or commodity from its point of origin to the
company and/or to the final retailer.
“Working child” is an individual under 18 years of age who engages in paid or unpaid work, whether in the
formal or informal sector, for at least one hour during a given reference period. This work includes the production
of goods for one’s own use, but does not include household chores carried out in a child’s own home.
APPENDIX B: ILAB COMMON INDICATORS AND SUB-INDICATORS
Due to performance reporting requirements under Government Performance and Results Act, ILAB has
developed the following indicators and sub-indicators:
INDICATORS
 Number of direct beneficiary children provided education or vocational training services.
 Number of households provided livelihood services.
 Evidence of increased country capacity to address child labor and forced labor.
SUB-INDICATORS
Education
 Number of children engaged in or at high-risk of entering child labor enrolled in formal education services.
 Number of children engaged in or at high-risk of entering child labor enrolled in non-formal education
services.
 Number of children engaged in or at high-risk of entering child labor enrolled in vocational services.
 Number of children trafficked or in commercial sexual exploitation, or at high-risk of being trafficked or
entering commercial sexual exploitation, provided education or vocational services. (Note: only applies to
projects targeting children in these areas).
Livelihoods
 Number of adults provided with employment services.
 No of children provided with employment services.
 Number of individuals provided with economic strengthening services.
Solicitation for Cooperative Agreement 13-11 Page 36 of 36
 No of individuals provided with services other than employment and economic strengthening.
Country Capacity
 The adaptation of the legal framework to meet international labor standards.
 Formulation and adoption of specific policies, plans or programs to combat child labor or forced labor.
 The inclusion of child labor or forced labor concerns in relevant development, education, anti-poverty, and
other social policies and programs.
 Establishment of a child labor monitoring system (CLMS) or forced labor monitoring system.
 Institutionalization of child labor and forced labor research (including evaluation and data collection).
 Institutionalization of training on child labor or forced labor issues within government agencies.
APPENDIX C: SAMPLE PAST PERFORMANCE TABLE
APPENDIX D: DOCUMENTS REQUIRED FOR APPLICATION SUBMISSION
Name of
Applicant/
Subgrantee/
Subcontractor
Agency/
Donor/
Organization
Agency/ Donor/
Contact
Information
(Name, telephone,
fax, e-mail)
Name of
the Project
and
Instrument
Number
Funding
Amount
(in $)
Country of
Implementation
and Period of
Performance
Brief Summary of
Work Performed
and
Accomplishments
Required Documents SCA Reference Applicant Subgrantee
(providing services
related to project
intervention strategies)
Subcontractor
(providing services related
to project intervention
strategies )
Technical Proposal Section IV.B.1 √
Cost Proposal Section IV.B.2 √
Past Performance Table Section
IV.B.1.d)(1)
Appendix D
√ √ √
Copy of the opinion letter(s)
and a summary of audit
findings
Section
IV.B.1.d)(5)
√ √ √
Documentation of Host
Country Presence and Host
Government Support
Section
IV.B.1.d)(2)

Key Personnel Signed Letters
of Commitment
Section
IV.B.1.d)(4)
√ √ √
Outputs based budget Section IV.B.2.c) √ √ √
SAM Registration Section IV.B.2.a) √
SF 424 Section IV.B.2.b) √
SF 424A Section IV.B.2.b) √
Indirect Cost Form ILAB Web site
and Grants.gov
√ √ √

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